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Olympic Sculpture Park: Student Benefits Abound

Scupture Park - Seattle, WASee the Photo Gallery from the Olympic Sculpture Tour.

“World-class artwork and world-class views,” says SPU Professor of Art Roger Feldman about Seattle’s new Olympic Sculpture Park. And he should know — he’s a well-known sculptor himself, and a frequent visitor to Seattle’s highly acclaimed 9-acre waterfront park.

“People come from all around the country to learn how we (Seattle) did this,” says Feldman. “It’s unique to have a park like this in an urban area. The views are amazing, and the sculptures — including works both from contemporary historical figures and newcomers — are outstanding.”

Feldman, chair of the SPU Art Department, encourages his students to take advantage of the many fine-arts opportunities available in Seattle. Students in his University Core class are required to visit one of Seattle’s art museums. And Feldman points out that other SPU faculty members promote the fine arts by making attendance at local music and theatre events a part of their course curriculum.

Scupture Park - Seattle, WA“Our students have the privilege of experiencing ‘the real thing’ — visual art, music, opera, theatre, and more — because of our location in the city of Seattle,” says Feldman. “You just can’t do those things as well in a smaller city.”

Visiting the Park

Those who'd like to visit the Olympic Sculpture Park can start by visiting its website for directions, hours, and more information.


Scupture Park - Seattle, WA

Photos from top:
Olympic Sculpture Park, view of Roxy Paine’s Split and Alexander Calder’s Eagle. Credit: Paul Warchol
PACCAR Pavilion and Anthony Caro’s Riviera. Credit: © Benjamin Benschneider and Weiss/Manfredi
Olympic Sculpture Park. Credit: Paul Warchol.


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