Clinical Psychology - Seattle Pacific University


 

Clinical Psychology
Seattle Pacific University
3307 Third Ave. W

Suite 107
Seattle, WA 98119
Phone: 206-281-2839
Fax: 206-281-2695
clinicalpsyc@spu.edu

 

A.C.E. Lab: People

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Principal Investigator

Amy Mezulis

Amy Mezulis, Ph.D.

Dr. Mezulis is a developmental psychopathologist interested in understanding the development of depression and related affect regulation disorders such as NSSI. Her research interests include vulnerability stress-models of depression; the development of vulnerabilities to depression in childhood and adolescence; the integration of cognitive, affective, and biological pathways to depression and NSSI; and the emergence of the gender difference in depression in adolescence. Learn more.

 


Current Students — At SPU


Sarah Crystal, M.S.

Sarah joined the program in 2010 and is a fifth-year graduate student. Her research interests include understanding the psychophysiological underpinnings and development of emotion dysregulation among children and adolescents. Sarah is also interested in the mechanisms through which stress, trauma, and negative life event antecedents affect development. For her dissertation, Sarah is examining the contribution of child temperament and parenting to the development of emotion dysregulation and subsequent borderline personality features in adolescence.

 


Kaitlin Harding

Kaitlin Harding

Kaitlin joined the program in 2011 and is a fourth-year graduate student. Her research interests include understanding vulnerabilities to depression and incorporating that understanding into behavioral interventions to reduce depressive symptoms in integrated care settings. Her dissertation examines affective and cognitive vulnerabilities to depression among adults.

 


Melissa Hudson

Melissa Hudson

Melissa joined the program in 2011 and is a fourth-year graduate student. Her research interests include negative cognitive style, rumination, and affect regulation. She is also interested in the mechanisms through which stressors and positive and negative life events impact development.

 


Josh Ahles


Josh joined the program in 2012 and is a third-year graduate student. His research interests center on the interaction between cognitive processes and physiological stress reactivity and recovery.

 

 

Michelle Kuhn, B.A.


Michelle joined the program in 2013 and is a second-year graduate student. Her research interests include adolescent psychopathology, with a focus on maladaptive emotion regulation strategies commonly associated with depression, disordered eating, NSSI, and drug and alcohol use.

 


Brittany Willey, B.M.

Brittany joined the program in 2013 and is a second-year graduate student. Her research interests include the origins of psychopathology in adolescence, with a specific focus on processes predicting the development of self-injurious and disordered eating behavior.

 

 

Jana DeSimone, B.A.

Jana joined the program in 2013 and is a second-year graduate student. Her research interests include physiology, depression, and eating disorders.


Graduates, and Students Away on Internship

 

Student Photo Anna Charbonneau, Ph.D.

 

Anna joined the doctoral program in 2005, defended her dissertation in 2011, and graduated in 2012 following her internship at Columbia Valley Community Health. Anna’s primary research interests are women’s health, stress-related disorders, and behavioral health interventions. For her dissertation, she developed a relaxation and meditation intervention called Women ROCK to prevent depressive symptoms among young women in their first year of college.

 

Student PhotoAmanda Herges, Ph.D.

Amanda joined the doctoral program in 2005, defended her dissertation in 2011, and graduated in 2012 after completing her internship at the University of Missouri in 2011. Her research interests focus on cognitive vulnerability-stress models of depressive symptoms among individuals with brain injuries. She is currently completing a two-year, post-doctoral fellowship at the Barrows Neurological Institute in Arizona.


Student Photo Kristyn Funasaki, Ph.D.

 

Kristyn joined the doctoral program in 2006, defended her dissertation in 2011, and graduated in 2012 after completing her internship at the University of Idaho's Counseling and Testing Center. Her areas of research interest include cognitive vulnerabilities to depression (including rumination and co-rumination) and gender differences between these variables. Kristyn’s specific interest is in understanding the mechanisms that explain why co-rumination leads to both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes.

 


Stephanie Cox, Ph.D.


Stephanie joined the program in 2006, defended her dissertation in 2011, and graduated in 2012 after completing her internship at West Virginia University. She is currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Family Medicine at West Virginia University’s School of Medicine.

 

 

Student Photo

Lauren Smith, Ph.D.


Lauren joined the doctoral program in 2006, will defend her dissertation in 2013, and graduated in 2013 following the completion of her internship at Western State Hospital. She will be a postdoctoral fellow in forensic psychology at Western State Hospital’s Center for Forensic Services in the fall of the 2013-2014. Her areas of research interest include cognitive vulnerabilities to depression and how rumination affects working memory.

 

 

Student Photo

Jordan Simonson, Ph.D.


Jordan joined the program in 2007, defended his dissertation in 2013, and graduated in 2013 after completing his internship with the United States Air Force at Malcolm Grow Air Force Base in Maryland. His research applies much of what we have learned about cognitive vulnerabilities — such as negative cognitive style and rumination — to the LGBTQ community.

 

 

Katey Anne Nicolai, M.A.

Katey joined the program in 2009, will defend her dissertation in 2014, and will graduate in 2015 following the completion of her internship at the University of Washington Counseling Center. Her research interests include vulnerabilities to depression in adolescence — specifically, depression, rumination, co-rumination, and non-suicidal self-injury behavior in adolescent girls. For her dissertation, Katey is examining predictors of nonsuicidal self-injury among college students.

 

 

Marissa Rudolph, M.A.

Marissa joined the program in 2009, will defend her dissertation in 2014, and will graduate in 2015 following the completion of her internship at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her research interests include rumination, stress recovery, mechanisms linking emotion regulation deficits to cognitive vulnerabilities to depression, and transdiagnostic models of psychopathology. For her dissertation, Marissa is examining the time course of affective, psychophysiological, and cognitive domains of stress responding as they interact with life stress exposure to predict depressive symptoms.

 


Student Photo

Tyler Laney, M.A.

Tyler joined the program in 2009, will defend his dissertation in 2014, and will graduate in 2015 following the completion of internship at Virginia Commonwealth University. His clinical interests include child and adolescent psychotherapy, with a particular focus on severe and persistent mental illness. Through his research interests, Tyler seeks to help this population use cognitive behavioral interventions to help regulate biology and behavior. For his dissertation, Tyler is examining physiological predictors of externalizing behavior.

 

 

Student Photo

Kara Pegram, M.A.

Kara joined the program in 2009, will defend her dissertation in 2014, and will graduate in 2015 following the completion of her internship at Madigan Army Medical Center. Her research interests are focused on adaptive and maladaptive stress responses as they predict mental health outcomes. For her dissertation, Kara is examining the impacts of exercise on depressive symptoms.

 

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